How apathetic traffic cops ruined a 26-year-old's life in half-hour. Is salary cut and transfer enough punishment for two heartless traffic constables who defied Supreme Court’s Golden Hour ruling?


Medical attention to Salauddin was delayed by 30 minutes

Last week, when Salauddin Shaikh (26) was injured in an accident, his life changed forever. A delay of over 30 minutes in reaching the hospital because two traffic constables didn't allow pedestrians to help him, cost Shaikh his right leg. His distraught mother, Akhtari Jamal, died of a heart attack after the bad news.

As a piecemeal offering, the Mumbai police have transferred the guilty traffic constables to the control room, which is considered punishment posting in the fraternity.

The two constables
The two constables

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It's been one tragedy after another for Shaikh, who was admitted to Karuna Hospital in Borivli, after his leg developed an infection, and was forced to undergo surgery on Monday. His mother, who could not handle the shock, died the same day at Kandivli's Shatabdi Hospital.

Shaikh's brother Jahangir, said, "It has been the toughest time of my life. When I was at Karuna Hospital while my brother was being operated, I got a call from my relative informing me that my mother had been rushed to Shatabdi after a heart attack. I asked the doctors to reschedule my brother's operation so that I could attend to my mother. But, before I could reach the hospital, she had passed away."

Salauddin's mother passed away on hearing the news
Salauddin's mother passed away on hearing the news

After performing the last rites, when Jahangir headed back to Karuna Hospital, he was informed that Shaikh's leg had been amputated.

Unrelenting cops
On May 12, mid-day broke the story of how Shaikh, who met with a bike accident near Aksa beach, did not receive help from the traffic constables on duty, who stood, watching him bleed, while waiting for a police van to arrive and take him away.

The constables also tried to stop pedestrians from helping Shaikh, who argued with them and eventually managed to take Shaikh to a hospital. But not before a half hour delay. "I wouldn't have lost my leg if I had been rushed to the hospital on time," Shaikh told mid-day, unsure if he will be able to make it back to work at a four-wheeler service centre in Malwani.

The victim's brother, Jahangir
The victim's brother, Jahangir

On May 12, he had stepped out for a ride to Aksa beach after informing his employer, Sandesh Kamble. Shaikh said that on his way, he saw traffic cops on the lookout for riders without helmets. "I slowed down, but a BEST bus hit me. I was on the road, my leg broken, and bleeding heavily," he recollected.

Kamble, who was informed about the incident, rushed to the site, to find him being given no help. "A group of local boys were arguing with the police constables. One of the constables even threatened me when I offered help," said Kamble.

According to him, later, staff from BEST met Shaikh's family in hospital and offered to take care of medical expenses. "However, no one has turned up to stay true to their word after," Kamble said.

When contacted, Joint Commissioner of Police (traffic), Amitesh Kumar said, "During preliminary inquiry, we found five constables guilty. They have all been transferred to the control room and further inquiry is on. We have recommended cuts in their salaries for one year."

With inputs from Rohan Koli