Actor says he'll create opportunities in the industry for his kids

Ronit Roy. Pic/Getty Images
Ronit Roy. Pic/Getty Images

An established name in the movies and a force to reckon with in television, Ronit Roy juggles the two worlds with enviable ease. At a time when the web is enjoying as the new platform for entertainment, it's only natural for an artiste of his calibre to explore opportunities. As he makes his debut on the digital platform with the Alt Balaji show, Kehne Ko Humsafar Hai, Roy talks about his love for TV and matter being more important than the medium.

What prompted you to say yes to Kehne Ko Humsafar Hai?
It's not your run-of-the-mill teenage love story. Mona [Singh] and I play mature adults, who cross paths and fall in love. It is a love triangle involving people above 40.

Neena Gupta is coming back with this show.
Yes, that is exciting. I've met Neenaji once. Unfortunately, she does not come on the set too often, which is why we haven't interacted much.

Having played a hero on TV for over a decade and a baddie in movies, which role offers you creative satisfaction?
Playing a character, irrespective of whether it's positive or negative, offers creative satisfaction. As an actor, I look for variety. Be it on TV or movies, the purpose of the medium is to provide entertainment. And it is unfair to compare the two mediums.

Now that you've established yourself in the movies, will we see you less on TV?
Television is one of my top priorities. I have been in the industry for 15 years and done everything that has excited me. However, of late, none of the projects offered to me have been exhilarating. If I'm offered something interesting like Adaalat, I will give my immediate nod.

At a time when nepotism is a raging debate, would you want your children to follow in your footsteps?
I've taught my children that if they love their profession, it's great. But their job is not the be-all and end-all of their lives. They can choose to do whatever they want to. And because I'm their father, I will help them in whatever way I can. A father who refuses to create opportunities for his kids — what would you call him? So if I can help, I definitely will.

You're playing a cop for the third time with Lucknow Central.
As a cop in Boss (2013), I played an out-and-out baddie. In Ugly (2014), I was a father and an insecure husband; being a cop was incidental. My character in Lucknow Central is different. He is a jailer, he is not dealing with crime. He handles a bunch of men, who want to form a band. Ideologically, it is different from the other pieces of work I've done.

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